Electoral reform needs better PR: Childhood addendum

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This is a brief addendum to the previous discussion about electoral reform. As I noted in Part III, s 3 of the Charter grants a right to vote to “[e]very citizen”, but not every citizen can vote. Most notably, citizens under 18 cannot vote. I’m going to discuss two less infringing alternatives than giving children… Continue reading Electoral reform needs better PR: Childhood addendum

Electoral Reform needs better PR (Part II)

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[This is the second of a three part post. In Part I, I proposed an alternative electoral system to provide locally proportional representation (LPR). LPR works by weighting legislators’ votes in the legislature according to the number of votes they received in the election. In Part III, I’ll discuss the courts’ role in all this.… Continue reading Electoral Reform needs better PR (Part II)

Electoral reform needs better PR (Part I)

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Introduction What better way is there to spend the aftermath of an election than to wring one’s hands about the difference between the parties’ seat count and the popular vote they received? It is, after all, as pure a form of ineffectual handwringing as one could wish: any form of proportional representation (PR) seems as… Continue reading Electoral reform needs better PR (Part I)

Reserving s. 33 for the right moment

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TL;DR The notwithstanding clause (s 33) is back in use in provincial legislatures, and so is in the news, in law journals, and in the courts. Prominent by its absence is Parliament. In this piece, I suggest Parliament could (and should!) play a greater role in governing the use of the notwithstanding clause. Specifically, I… Continue reading Reserving s. 33 for the right moment